Wednesday, 20 April 2011

Generation Alzheimer's - The Defining Disease Of The Baby Boomers

Alzheimer's Association
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News Facts

  • This year, the first wave of baby boomers are turning 65 – and with increased age comes increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease.
  • Our new report, "Generation Alzheimer's: The Defining Disease of the Baby Boomers," sheds light on a crisis that is no longer emerging – but here.
  • Many baby boomers will spend their retirement years either with Alzheimer's or caring for someone who has it.
  • An estimated 10 million baby boomers will develop Alzheimer's.
  • Starting this year, more than 10,000 baby boomers a day will turn 65. As these baby boomers age, one of out of eight of them will develop Alzheimer’s – a devastating, costly, heartbreaking disease. Increasingly for these baby boomers, it will no longer be their grandparents and parents who have Alzheimer’s – it will be them.
  • "Alzheimer’s is a tragic epidemic that has no survivors. Not a single one," said Harry Johns, president and CEO of the Alzheimer’s Association. "It is as much a thief as a killer. Alzheimer’s will darken the long-awaited retirement years of the one out of eight baby boomers who will develop it. Those who will care for these loved ones will witness, day by day, the progressive and relentless realities of this fatal disease. But we can still change that if we act now."
  • According to the new Alzheimer’s Association report, "Generation Alzheimer’s," it is expected that 10 million baby boomers will either die with or from Alzheimer’s, the only cause of death among the top 10 in America without a way to prevent, cure or even slow its progression. But, while Alzheimer’s kills, it does so only after taking everything away, slowly stripping an individual’s autonomy and independence. Even beyond the cruel impact Alzheimer’s has on the individuals with the disease, Generation Alzheimer’s also details the negative cascading effects the disease places on millions of caregivers. Caregivers and families go through the agony of losing a loved one twice: first to the ravaging effects of the disease and then, ultimately, to actual death.
  • "Most people survive an average of four to six years after a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease, but many can live as long as 20 years with the disease. As the disease progresses, the person with dementia requires more and more assistance with everyday tasks like bathing, dressing, eating and household activities," said Beth Kallmyer, senior director of Constituent Relations for the Alzheimer’s Association. "This long duration often places increasingly intensive care demands on the nearly 15 million family members and friends who provide unpaid care, and it negatively affects their health, employment, income and financial security."
  • In addition to the human toll, over the next 40 years Alzheimer’s will cost the nation $20 trillion, enough to pay off the national debt and still send a $20,000 check to every man, woman and child in America. And while every 69 seconds someone in America develops Alzheimer’s disease today, by 2050 someone will develop the disease every 33 seconds - unless the federal government commits to changing the Alzheimer’s trajectory.
  • "Alzheimer’s – with its broad ranging impact on individuals, families, Medicare and Medicaid - has the power to bring the country to its financial knees," said Robert J. Egge, vice president of Public Policy of the Alzheimer’s Association. "But when the federal government has been focused, committed and willing to put the necessary resources to work to confront a disease that poses a real public health threat to the nation – there has been great success. In order to see the day where Alzheimer’s is no longer a death sentence, we need to see that type of commitment with Alzheimer’s." The full text of the Alzheimer’s Association’s "Generation Alzheimer’s" report can be viewed at
  • About The Alzheimer's Association

    The Alzheimer's Association is the world’s leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer’s care, support and research.

    Our mission is to eliminate Alzheimer’s disease through the advancement of research; to provide and enhance care and support for all affected; and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health.

    For more information, visit:

    The History of The Alzheimer’s Association

    In 1979, Jerome H. Stone and representatives from several family support groups met with the National Institute on Aging to explore the value of a national, independent, nonprofit organization to complement federal efforts surrounding Alzheimer's disease. That meeting resulted in the April 10, 1980, formation of the Alzheimer's Association with Mr. Stone as founding president.

    Today, the Association reaches millions of people affected by Alzheimer’s across the globe through our national office and local chapters across the country. As the largest donor-supported, voluntary health organization for Alzheimer’s, the Association is a catalyst for advancements in Alzheimer's research and care.


    Our online donation form is fast, easy and secure. You can make a general donation, a tribute/memorial donation to honor someone, or a monthly gift.

    Alzheimer's Association is a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) organization. Donations are tax-deductible. Our federal tax ID number is 13-3039601.

    Donate online now
    Donate by phone: 1.800.272.3900
    Donate by mail:
    Send a check to: Alzheimer's Association
    P.O. Box 96011
    Washington, DC 20090-6011

    As Alzheimer's disease threatens to bankrupt families, businesses and our healthcare system, scientists are coming closer to finding better treatments that could drastically alter the course of the disease. Now is the time to join us and speak up for the needs and rights of people with Alzheimer's and their families, and help persuade Congress to increase funding for research. As an advocate, you will generate action from our elected officials by making calls and writing letters.

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